Link Search Menu Expand Document

Troubleshooting SUDO

Check if configuration of sudo and SSSD cooperation is correct

To check whether the basic configuration of sudo and SSSD is correct, check /etc/nsswitch.conf and /etc/sssd/sssd.conf files.

  • /etc/nsswitch.conf must say that sss module is used for sudo service. Look for line like "sudoers: sss" (only SSSD is used), "sudoers: files sss" (local rules first, then SSSD) or similar.
  • /etc/sssd/sssd.conf must say that sudo responder is enabled. Look at [sssd] section and search for line "services: nss, pam, sudo" or similar.
  • In /etc/sssd/sssd.conf check that sudo provider is enabled. Look at [domain] section, sudo provider is always enabled for ldap, ad and ipa providers, unless this section contains “sudo_provider = none”.

Obtaining logs

Logs can provide many useful information when finding a solution for your troubles.

a) How do I get sudo logs?

  1. Open /etc/sudo.conf and put down the following lines: :

    Debug sudo /var/log/sudo_debug all@debug
    Debug sudoers.so /var/log/sudo_debug all@debug
    
  2. Run sudo

  3. File /var/log/sudo_debug contains sudo logs

b) How do I get SSSD logs?

  1. Open /etc/sssd/sssd.conf and enable logging by setting a debug level in [sudo] and [domain/$NAME] section: debug_level = 0x3ff0
  2. Restart SSSD
  3. Run sudo
  4. Log files are stored in /var/log/sssd/sssd_$NAME.log (domain log) and /var/log/sssd/sssd_sudo.log (sudo responder log)

What to look for in the logs

a) SSSD sudo responder – sssd_sudo.log:

  • Was a rule returned to sudo at all? :

    [sssd[sudo]] [sudosrv_get_sudorules_from_cache] (0x0400): Returning $num-rules rules for [user-1@LDAP.PB]
    
  • What filter was used to fetch rules from cache? :

    [sudosrv_get_sudorules_query_cache] (0x0200): Searching sysdb with [(&(objectClass=sudoRule)(|(sudoUser=ALL)(sudoUser=user-1)(sudoUser=#10001)(sudoUser=%group-1)(sudoUser=%user-1)(sudoUser=+*)))]
    
  • You can then use this filter to lookup in SSSD cache to see what rules were returned :

    # when using yum
    yum install ldb-tools
        
    # when using dnf
    dnf install ldb-tools
        
    ldbsearch -H /var/lib/sss/db/cache_$domain.ldb -b cn=sysdb '$filter'
    
  • SSSD cache uses LDAP-like format equal to sudo format described in man sudoers.ldap

b) SSSD domain – sssd_$domain.log

  • How many rules were found? :

    [sdap_sudo_refresh_load_done] (0x0400): Received $num-rules rules
    
  • What sudo rules were downloaded from server? :

    [sssd[be[LDAP.PB]]] [sysdb_save_sudorule] (0x0400): Adding sudo rule $rule-name
    
  • Were all matching rules stored? :

    [sdap_sudo_refresh_load_done] (0x0400): Sudoers is successfully stored in cache
    
  • What filter was used to fetch rules from server? :

    [sdap_get_generic_ext_step] (0x0400): calling ldap_search_ext with [(&(objectClass=sudoRole)(|(!(sudoHost=*))(sudoHost=ALL)(sudoHost=client.sssd.pb)(sudoHost=client)(sudoHost=10.34.78.77)(sudoHost=10.34.78.0/24)(sudoHost=2620:52:0:224e:21a:4aff:fe23:1394)(sudoHost=2620:52:0:224e::/64)(sudoHost=fe80::21a:4aff:fe23:1394)(sudoHost=fe80::/64)(sudoHost=+*)(|(sudoHost=*\\*)(sudoHost=*?*)(sudoHost=*\2A*)(sudoHost=*[*]*))))][dc=ldap,dc=pb]
    
  • You can then use ldapsearch with this exact filter to see what rules were downloaded

    • Anonymous bind:

        ldapsearch -x -H ldap://ldap.example.com -b dc=ldap,dc=example,dc=com '$filter'
      
    • Simple bind :

        ldapsearch -x -D "cn=Directory Manager" -w "$password" -H ldap://ldap.example.com -b dc=ldap,dc=example,dc=com '$filter'
      
    • GSSAPI :

        ldapsearch -Y GSSAPI -H ldap://ldap.example.com -b dc=ldap,dc=example,dc=com '$filter'
      

c) sudo debug logs – sudo_debug

  • Information about user that is attempting to run sudo :

    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] settings: debug_flags=all@debug
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] settings: run_shell=true
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] settings: progname=sudo
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] settings: network_addrs=10.71.4.192/255.255.255.0 fe80::250:56ff:feb9:7d6/ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff::
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: user=$username
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: pid=22259
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: ppid=22172
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: pgid=22259
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: tcpgid=22259
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: sid=22172
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: uid=$uid
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: euid=0
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: gid=554801393
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: egid=554801393
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: groups=498,6004,6005,7001,106501,554800513,554801107,554801108,554801393,554801503,554802131,554802244,554807670
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: cwd=/
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: tty=/dev/pts/1
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: host=$hostname
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: lines=31
    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] user_info: cols=237
    
  • What data sources are used to fetch sudo rules :

    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] <- sudo_parseln @ ./fileops.c:178 := sudoers: files sss
    
  • SSSD plugin starts here :

    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] <- sudo_sss_open @ ./sssd.c:305 := 0
    
  • Here is sudo looking for cn=defaults :

    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] Looking for cn=defaults
    
  • SSSD is returning rules :

    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] Received 3 rule(s)
    
  • …and sudo is evaluating them by matching sudoHost, sudoUser, … attributes to current user

  • hostname is OK :

    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] sssd/ldap sudoHost 'ALL' ... MATCH!
    
  • if something does not match, you will see line ending := false; you need to guess the test from function name :

    Mar 31 16:11:15 sudo[22259] <- user_in_group @ ./pwutil.c:1010 := false
    

Common questions

a) Setting global options with cn=defaults when sudo rules are stored on an IPA server

To imitate global options, create a rule named cn=defaults in LDAP tree or rule named defaults in IPA and set sudoOption attribute as you wish.

b) !authenticate does not work

A common problem is when you set !authenticate option to a specific rule but sudo -l command that lists all rules still requires authentication. If you want sudo -l to be password-less you need to set !authenticate also in cn=defaults.

c) it takes too long to update rules

Look at man sssd-sudo to see how sudo rules are cached in SSSD.

d) what is alternative to options in command definition in sudoers

In sudoers, you can define an allowed command together with many options, such as: :

%wheel  ALL=(ALL) ROLE=unconfined_r TYPE=unconfined_t ALL
john    ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

These all have their equivalent as a sudo option that can be placed in sudoOption attribute. Usually it is only lower cased value of this command option, with an exception of NOPASSWD which is referenced as authenticate. See SUDOERS OPTIONS section of sudoers.5 manual page for more information.

Known issues

Problems with IPA-AD trust when fully qualified names are required for IPA

Fixed in 1.14.0: https://github.com/SSSD/sssd/issues/3960

In configurations that requires IPA users and groups to use fully qualified names (i.e. username@IPA.DOMAIN and groupname@IPA.DOMAIN) sudo is not able to resolve the users or groups in sudo rules correctly.

Example configuration: :

[sssd]
domains = IPA.DOMAIN
default_domain_suffix = AD.DOMAIN

Or: :

[domain/IPA.DOMAIN]
use_fully_qualified_names = True

Sudo rule won’t work since 1.13.4 if it contains non-POSIX group with IPA provider

Won’t fix, intentional: https://github.com/SSSD/sssd/issues/4079

We switched to IPA sudo rules schema stored at cn=sudo in SSSD 1.13.4. The slapi-nis plugin that is used to generate the compat tree ou=sudoers unfold members of non-POSIX group and stores each as sudoUser: member value. This makes sudo rules work even with non-POSIX group if the compat tree is used.

To re-enable this functionality, you can switch SSSD to fetch sudo rules from the compat tree again by setting ldap_sudo_search_base to ou=sudoers,dc=example,dc=com

The correct way to reference a non-POSIX group in sudo rule is to include it by a POSIX one which is referenced by sudo as “sudorule —\POSIX group <— non-POSIX group”.

Asking for help

Most of the sudo related user cases that we have in past years was actually only a misconfiguration of sudo rule or the client system. If you are not able to track down the issue yourself, feel free to ask one of the developers on SSSD mailing list or #sssd IRC channel on freenode. To speed things up, please prepare the following information:

  • Description of the problem and what have you found out. You should at least know whether the issue lies on sudo (rules are send to sudo but it unexpectedly rejects access) or sssd (the rule is not even send to sudo) side with the use of previous debugging information.
  • sudo and SSSD logs
  • LDIF of rules that are expected to work but don’t
  • Any additional information you deemed helpful – e.g. group membership, output of the following commands:
    • id $user
    • getent group $group
    • getent netgroup $netgroup

Supported versions

Sudo integration is supported since version 1.8.6 of sudo itself and version 1.9 of sssd.